Davide Neri’s Il Monticello

Monticello

For July’s featured winery we’re trekking up to the hills just above the northwestern Italian coastline. Davide Neri and his bother Alessandro began the conversion of their father’s vineyards to organic and biodynamic viticulture following a meeting with Claudio Icardi in the early nineties. Not much of these wines make it to our shores, and this is the first time we’ve had a white, red, and rosé all at the same time. All three are full of sun and life, and seemingly made with these lazy summer months in mind. They’re not picky about food, so plunk any of these down on the patio table with Mediterranean seafood dishes or just your average barbecue. Expert tip: chill the red!

10% off all month long!

Rose Sampler

We sold out of the first Rose Sampler sooner than we thought we would, so we’ve released an all new version. All new wines from practically everywhere that makes rosé except Provence, because you’ve probably got those down. Click here to see the old one.

Sun’s out buns out, string up the Christmas lights on the patio, set the Pandora to Isley Brothers, everybody bring something to throw on the grill, set your alarm so you can call in sick tomorrow morning, summer is here! What do we want to drink? Beer! What else? Rosé! You’ll be pleased to know we’ve expedited your shopping experience and put together a six-pack of some of our favorite pink patio pounders. Better still, we’re offering said six-pack at a better-than-case-discount price of $77, leaving you still plenty of scratch to pile on the pilsners. Hop on over here to buy one now…

Birichino

Birichino

AlexKrauseAlumni of Randall Graham’s Bonny Doon Vineyards Alex Krause (pictured at right) and John Locke launched Birichino with the inaugural release of their malvasia bianco from the 2008 vintage. Right away, this should tell you that their going about making wine in California in a less conventional way. Malvasia of one form or another may have been propagated by Italian immigrants in California in the 19th century, but commercial viability has largely eluded the variety/(varieties). After a few years of Eric Asimov teasing us with his unconditional praise of Birichino, we finally have access to the wines here in Massachusetts. It was clear in tasting with Krause in Cambridge a couple months ago that the aim here is to produce wines that are lower alcohol, food friendly, and enjoyment-driven, descriptors that may not be appropriate for the bulk of wine currently being produced in California.

Please join us Friday, June 10th, 5-7 pm, as we taste Birichino malvasia, vin gris (rosé), pinot noir, grenache, and muscat canelli. Enjoy a 10% discount on these wines throughout the month of June.